Ear nose and throat question-Otolaryngology (ENT) Question Bank - ardythandjennifer.com

This quiz covers the assessment of the ear , nose , and throat. Forgot your password? Speak now. Training Maker Discuss. Survey Maker Flashcards See All.

Ear nose and throat question

Ear nose and throat question

Ear nose and throat question

Ear nose and throat question

If a grommet is needed to ventilate the ear, such as in otitis media, it must be inserted into the posterior inferior part of the tympanic membrane to Spanking cruise bdsm any structures of the middle ear. See how much you know about the ears, nose, and throat by taking this quiz, based on Ear nose and throat question from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. A good noes point is to look for someone who is Board Jose and fellowship trained in the specialty. How well do you know PewDiePie? Also available for 6-months' duration. Snoring may be caused by the airway becoming blocked by throat muscles that are too relaxed or by the tongue falling backward into the airway. You have completed. Common ENT Questions What are some of the disorders and diseases that ear, nose, throat Ear nose and throat question treat? Forgot your password? It also leads to swelling, pain and tenderness around the eyes and face.

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Notify me of new posts by email. I applied through an employee referral. If antibiotics are not effective, sinus surgery can correct the problem. The nurse concludes that the client needs further understanding about the teachings if he says:. Warm moist air may alleviate sinus congestion. Pain over the sinus area and purulent nasal secretions would be evident with sinusitis. Question Ear nose and throat question Explanation:. Tell me how to cum have entered an incorrect email address! Which cookies and scripts are used and how qjestion impact your visit is specified on the left. Always avoid saline moisturizers and sprays containing preservatives or other additiveswhich make my patients worse!

Very common.

  • Posted by James Fenn Quiz.
  • Charlotte Eye Ear Nose and Throat.
  • Nurse collects a history from a client suspected of a sensorineural hearing loss.

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Congratulations - you have completed Ear, nose and throat quiz. Your answers are highlighted below. Question 1. The Eustachian tube connects the eye to the nose. Question 1 Explanation:. The Eustachian tube can also be called the auditory tube or pharyngotympanic tube. It is a connection between the middle ear and the nasopharynx. It also drains mucus from the middle ear. Question 2. The tensor tympani is the only muscle present in the inner ear.

Question 2 Explanation:. There are two muscles that are present in the inner ear, they are: the tensor tympani and the stapedius. An easy way to remember this is TTT — tensor tympani trigeminal. Question 3. Question 3 Explanation:. It points anterior-inferior in a normal ear. This is handy to know as you can use it to orientate yourself as to which tympanic membrane you are looking at. The umbo is the tip of the handle of the malleus. The absence of the light reflex can be normal or due to an increased inner ear pressure e.

Question 4. The superior part of the tympanic membrane is known as the pars flaccida. Question 4 Explanation:. Tympanic membrane anatomy is important to know for a number of reasons. The pars flaccida is comparatively fragile to the pars tensa which is the inferior and larger part of the tympanic membrane, made up of three layers: skin, fibrous tissue and mucosa and is made up of two layers.

A cholesteatoma an accumulation of keratinising squamous epithelial cells can form if the pars flaccida prolapses into the middle ear. This can cause significant problems within the ear, damaging ossicles and can even spread through the base of the skull.

Clinically the anatomy behind the tympanic membrane must be known. Including information about which bones, nerves and muscles that run behind the ear. If a grommet is needed to ventilate the ear, such as in otitis media, it must be inserted into the posterior inferior part of the tympanic membrane to avoid any structures of the middle ear.

Question 5. Question 5 Explanation:. This statement is absolute rubbish. Question 6. The tongue is partially innervated by the facial nerve. Question 6 Explanation:. Although this statement is true, the body is never that straightforward, particularly the tongue! The tongue itself is split into motor and sensory functions. The majority of motor function is innervated by the hypoglossal nerve Cranial Nerve 12, XII however the palatoglossus a small muscles involved in initiating swallowing and elevating the posterior tongue, extremely specific is Vagus.

Now the sensory part is split into taste and sensation as in pain. The posterior third of the tongue is innervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve Cranial Nerve 9, IX. Question 7. The vocal cords are attached anteriorly by the arytenoid cartilage.

Question 7 Explanation:. In fact the arytenoid cartilage attaches the vocal cords posteriorly, it is attached anteriorly by the thyroid cartilage. The vocal cords are two infoldings of mucous membrane that allow vibrations to be transmitted as sounds. The vagus nerve innervates the cords. They are located at the top of the trachea within the larynx and are covered by the epiglottis when swallowing to prevent anything from entering the trachea. Question 8. The bridge of the nose is made out of cartilage.

Question 8 Explanation:. Below this point the nose is made of cartilage; septal cartilage, lateral cartilage and the alar cartilage that makes up the tip of the nose. It is important to know where the nasal bridge is as during a nosebleed you should squeeze just below this point. Question 9. Question 9 Explanation:. The cochlea is responsible for hearing and the vestibule for balance. The cochlea is a spiralled hollow canal within the skull.

The nerve impulses are then interpreted as sound. The vestibule is made up of three semicircular canals. Hair cells in the canals detect the sensations of balance and motion.

Question The bones of the ear from the outside to inside are: Incus, Stapes and Malleus? Question 10 Explanation:. This statement is not true. This is the order of the ossicles bones of the ear from the outside to in. These bones and are all inside the middle part of the ear. The malleus transmits sound vibration from the tympanic membrane to the incus. The stapes transmits sound to the oval window, which is the first part of the inner ear and leads to the vestibule. Malleus translates to Hammer.

Incus translates to Anvil. Stapes translates to Stirrup. These names are of Latin origin and all refer to their appearance. Once you are finished, click the button below.

Any items you have not completed will be marked incorrect. You have completed. You have not finished your quiz. If you leave this page, your progress will be lost. Previous Cranial Nerves Summary. About The Author. James Fenn 4th Year Medical Student.

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Supine with a small pillow. Helpful 0. Six cardinal fields of gaze. Floaters are characteristics of retinal detachment. Aug 24, During the nursing history, which assessment data would the nurse expect the client scheduled for surgical correction of chronic open-angle glaucoma to report? Please wait while the activity loads.

Ear nose and throat question

Ear nose and throat question

Ear nose and throat question

Ear nose and throat question. Interviews at Charlotte Eye Ear Nose and Throat

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Ear, Nose, and Throat Quiz - Health Encyclopedia - University of Rochester Medical Center

Ear, nose, and throat problems affect both children and adults. Knowing how to prevent and treat them can help you stay healthy. See how much you know about the ears, nose, and throat by taking this quiz, based on information from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

Search Encyclopedia. Cotton swabs are a safe and easy way to remove wax from the inside of your ears. You didn't answer this question. The correct answer is. Inserting cotton-tipped applicators or other small objects into your ear pushes wax deeper into the ear canal.

This causes buildup of wax and affects hearing. Earwax protects the skin of the ear canal. When earwax builds up, you can have partial hearing loss, ringing in the ears, or a feeling that the ear canal is plugged.

Your body often clears earwax from the canal, so cleaning isn't needed. Using a cotton swab also can damage the eardrum, causing a hole and hearing loss.

True B. Hay fever can be caused by allergies to pollen, dust, ragweed, and animal dander. Hay fever is a commonly used term for seasonal allergic rhinitis. This condition causes symptoms such as a runny nose, itchy eyes and throat, and sneezing, but no fever.

It is caused by pollen allergens in the air, including those of grasses and hay. A person can be trained not to snore. But lifestyle changes, weight loss, and medical treatment can help. Snoring may be caused by the airway becoming blocked by throat muscles that are too relaxed or by the tongue falling backward into the airway. A long uvula, the tissue that dangles at the back of the throat, or a long soft palate can flutter during the deep breathing of sleep.

Nasal passages that are obstructed by a cold or allergy can cause snoring. Snoring can disturb sleep patterns and cause health problems. Snoring should be evaluated by a healthcare provider. You can "toughen up" your ears by continued exposure to loud noise. Once your hearing is lost, nothing can bring it back. To prevent hearing loss, use appropriate hearing protectors when working in a noisy environment and when using power tools, noisy yard equipment, or firearms. Also use earplugs when at loud recreational events such as rock concerts, pulling contests, and monster truck shows.

Be careful about the volume when using headphones to listen to music. You should try not to speak or sing when your voice is hoarse. If the problem is caused by overuse yelling or singing , a voice therapist or coach can train you in correct ways to use your voice. If hoarseness lasts longer than 2 weeks, or if you have pain or difficulty swallowing, or you cough up blood, see your healthcare provider.

Lake or pond water contains bacteria and fungi. When this water gets into the ear, those bacteria and fungi also enter. Nosebleeds can be caused by blowing your nose a lot from a cold and allergies, by nose picking, or by getting hit in the nose. Nosebleeds are also common in dry climates or in the winter, when the humidity indoors may be low. The low humidity causes the nasal membranes to dry out and crack, causing bleeding. Ask your healthcare provider about saline nose drops or an ointment to moisten tissues in your nose.

Ear nose and throat question

Ear nose and throat question